Blood: the story of the Masai girl who fights against infibulation (13/09/2021)

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It is out on September 14, 2021 for Piemme Edition, “Blood: the story of the Maasai girl who fights against infibulation”, by Nice Nailantei Leng’ete, the book we have been waiting for for years. In 2014, several outlets reported on a young Amref Health Africa worker who would change the future of African women by challenging the social norms of a male-dominated community in an attempt to end female genital mutilation. It was the first time that the Nice story appeared in Italy.

They were right. Today that young woman, whose path to freedom began in 2001, has made it: she has saved almost twenty thousand girls from the “cut”, a mutilation suffered, worldwide, by 200 million women and girls. For the very young of the community, a practice that marks the entrance into adult life, recognition and acceptance, submission. But for many it can mean death.

As Time wrote after proclaiming her one of the 100 most influential people on the planet: “Female genital mutilation and early and forced marriages in Africa will end thanks to people of the caliber of Nice”. Today Nice is the spokesperson for a very important humanitarian campaign, which has the ambitious goal of abolishing female genital mutilation by 2030. Nice is the symbol of a necessary battle that will change the destiny of hundreds of thousands of young women. And her story is a clear example of female empowerment. Even personalities like Bill Clinton, Fiorella Mannoia, George Clooney, Emma Bonino, Trevor Noah, Laura Boldrini and many others have spent words of admiration for Nice’s work.

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The book will be distributed in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and Italy. “Today I am 29 years old”, Nice declares in a recent interview. “In 2001, at the age of 9, I fled my village, a small community on the border between Kenya and Tanzania, after the loss of my parents, to escape female genital mutilation.” That day, for the very young Nice, a life as an “outcast” began: there was no space in the Masai culture for a rebellious woman. Showing uncommon courage, Nice grew up and embraced a mission that she never abandoned again: to fight with all her strength, because every woman has the right to be free.

“Now I am fighting so that every girl can become the woman of their dreams… just like me” Nice said. The “A Nice Place” project was born from this need, aimed at establishing a safe place where girls can go when threatened by mutilation or forced marriage at an early age. The book is also dedicated to the girls of A Nice Place: “you are the future!” writes the author.

Credit Photo Steve-Kagia

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