Nicole Kidman and other celebs who don’t like the sun

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“I’m afraid of the sun because of the damage it can general to the skin,” he said Amanda Seyfried during an interview. Like the Mank actress, there are many Hollywood stars allergic to suntan. From Nicole Kidman, that despite being born in sunny Hawaii, her diaphanous skin would not give up for anything in the world Madonna, who take shelter on the beach under huge umbrellas and always wear long clothes (the most informed even talking about a wetsuit). But also Charlize Theron, who simply finds herself prettier and more pale Kristen Stewart, who, considering her pallor, has perhaps identified herself excessively in the vampire role that made her famous. In short, the idea of ​​being kissed by the sun does not touch any of these celebs, but exposing yourself with moderation and with the right precautions to the sun’s rays not only returns a golden complexion, but allows you to fill up on vitamin D, essential substance for fix calcium in the bones. In its activated form, this vitamin acts as a hormone that regulates certain organs and modulates the activity of the immune and inflammatory system. Its deficiency can cause chronic fatigue, muscle pain, the development of cavities and is associated with a greater predisposition to infections and diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, heart attack, Alzheimer’s, asthma, multiple sclerosis. Its contribution is also essential to prevent rickets in children and osteoporosis in the elderly.

vitamin d

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Where is vitamin D found

“Only 10% of the daily requirement of vitamin D comes fromPower supply. The foods in which it is found the most are those of animal origin such as i fatty fish (salmon, herring, mackerel), the liver, the egg yolk, the milk, i cheeses, i mushrooms, Cod liver oil. It is also minimally obtained from some green leafy vegetables such as beets, spinach, herbs. To facilitate their absorption by our body, it is good to associate these foods with a source of fats such as olive oil. Vitamin D is in fact fat-soluble, that is, it dissolves in fats. In some countries, such as in the United States, but not in Italy, some foods, for example breakfast cereals, are industrially reinforced with various vitamins, including vitamin D “, explains the doctor. Federica Patrinicola, nutritionist. The rest is formed in the skin starting from a fat similar to cholesterol, which is transformed by effect exposure to UVB rays. Once produced in the skin or absorbed in the intestine, vitamin D passes into the blood. Here a particular protein carries it up to liver or to the kidneys where it comes from activated. That is why diet alone is not enough to ensure an adequate supply of this substance e moderate exposure to the sun becomes essential. “It can take 10/20 minutes for a couple of times a week, avoiding the hottest hours and always using a protective cream with UVA filter to avoid redness and prevent erythema”, says the expert.

vitamin d

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How to supplement vitamin D.

“Dietary supplements should only be used if clinical findings show a vitamin D deficiency. Generally speaking do-it-yourself integration should always be avoided because at best our organism, which is a perfect machine, eliminates what we don’t need. At worst, however, it causes serious damage. An excess of vitamin D can cause gastrointestinal disorders, vomiting and diarrhea, muscle pain, but also the loss of calcium with consequent weakening of the bones or calcification of the soft tissues “, concludes Dr. Patrinicola.

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