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The men of power from Haiti who do business here

The names of 12 men with economic, political and financial power in Haiti are circulating and, of these, it is at least known that Gilbert Bigio, of Arab-American origin, is a corporate part of companies in the fuel sector in the Dominican Republic, as well as in others related to information systems, air, land and sea freight transport, construction, steelworks and the importation of food products.

In the food area, it stands out that the powerful businessman based in Washington is the most important representative of brands of imported consumer goods, such as Kraft, P. Morris, Goya and Smuker’s.

The names of the oligarchs come to light at a time when Haiti is going through a major political, social and economic conflict with attacks by criminal gangs commanded by “barbacue” and that have made the government headed by Minister Ariel Henry authorize the Caracol industrial park the importation of fuels from the Dominican Republic, according to publications by Le Nouvelliste.

We must find a way for the power groups of Haiti and the Dominican Republic, with close relations, to contribute to the search for viable alternatives to the Haitian crisis, as well as to the strengthening of good relations between the peoples and States of Haiti and the DR, in the opinion of Haitian affairs analyst Luis Vargas, through the Haitian Studies Unit, the Father José Luis Alemán Study Center, of the Pontifical Catholic University Madre y Maestra (PUCMM).

Entrepreneurs in Haiti

In addition to Gilbert Bigio, Charles Baker, Reginaldo Boulo, Sherif Abdallah, Fritz Mevs, Reynold Deeb, Gregory Brandt, Andy Apaid, Carl Braun, Marc-Antoine, Richard Coles and Franck Helmcke are cited among the 12 most influential men in Haiti.

Bigio is credited with being the most powerful in Haiti, an American citizen of origin and with close ties to the Israeli lobby of the US Congress.

According to publications, it would acquire the network of Texaco stations in the Dominican Republic. In the energy area, the businessman Bigio is credited with operations in five Caribbean countries plus 400 fuel stations of the Shell, Chevron and Texaco brands, eight airports and five fuel import terminals, including Aviation Business in Punta Cana, Santiago and Samaná in the Dominican Republic

It is also the second largest construction group in Haiti.

Operates investment finance and brokerage firm GB Capital, and building products industry Southern Steel

It also has significant capital in HUHSA, a company dedicated to the manufacture of oils, detergent powder, margarine, packaging goods and others.

Other investments are syndicated in Caribbean Media and Challenges, in the Lafito Seaport and ZFIE, in Agro Products and Services, in Florida, the main headquarters of Grupo Bigio’s operations. He has three key sources of information and would have done other business operations with the Bonettis and the Mervs, for operations in the port of Port-au-Prince. As well as there was talk of possible business in the port of Cap Haitien, through businessman Rolando González Bunster and the Vicini.

the links

The Total, Shell, Nativa, Sunix, Sigma, Ecopetroleo, Petronan, and Nex gas stations are among the mixed investments with Haitian businessmen, revealed the president of the National Association of Gasoline Retailers (Anadegas), Juan Matos.

In November 2012, GB Group, through its affiliate Gulfstream Petroleum, announced the fuel marketing and distribution process and the aviation companies that Chevron Caribbean owns in the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Saint Maarten, according to a local media outlet, of that date. Attributes Martí PG, Grupo Bermúdez M., and La Universal de Seguros to form the strategic corporate part in the Dominican market of GB Group and that this is one of the main private industrial groups in the Caribbean with offices in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and the South Florida.

exchange of goods

fsfs In terms of commercial goods between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, the exchange reached US$6,899.2 million from 2015 to 2021 and the first seven months of 2022. Of these, 97.6% were goods exported by this country and the remaining 2.4% correspond to imports of Haitian goods.

The data, recorded by the Export and Investment Center (ProDominicana) shows Haiti’s deficit in terms of trade, falling every year.

In 2021, the trade balance between both markets was US$954.9 million, of which US$950.8 million were Dominican exports and US$4.0 million were imports from Haiti.

According to the data, the Dominican Republic exported to Haiti cotton fabrics, T-shirst and t-shirts, portland cement, wheat, soybean oil; plates, sheets, sheets, strip of non-cellular polymers of ethylene; sweet cookies, paper or corrugated cardboard boxes, tableware and other items for tableware or plastic kitchen, for a value of US$454.9 million. The remaining US$500 million correspond to other unidentified products, for a total of US$954.9 million. The top ten imported products are petticoat slips, textile for women and girls; sweaters “jerseys”, “pullovers”, cardigans, vests and synthetic articles; synthetic fiber fabrics, articles for rod fishing, butterfly nets; undenatured tobacco, labels, emblems, T-shirts and T-shirts, knitted, of cotton; parts of garments or accessories clothing accessories; buckets, clam scoops, shovels and claws or tweezers, cotton fabrics, for a value of US$3.2 million. Other products for US$0.9 million, for a total of US$4.0 million in imports.

Data

First seven months of 2022

January July

Exports of goods from the DR to Haiti reached a value of US$769.8 million, equivalent to an interannual growth of 25.53%.

Products

The main products correspond to cotton fabrics, T-shirts and knit shirts, portland cement, soybean oil, wheat flour, iron or steel bars, tableware and other kitchen items; plates, sheets, iron bars, cotton fabrics, demijohns, bakery products, and corrugated paper or cardboard boxes.

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