TikTok, Clubhouse and Onlyfans: the new social networks that revolutionize fashion

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Conversely, Twitter relies on polarized comments between accounts to propel conversation, and often avoids the subtle comparisons of blunt discussions and intentional misunderstandings. While Clubhouse has been contested for its lack of moderation resources, Edwards believes the vocal nature of the app allows for a healthier debate: “It prevents what you are saying from being misunderstood or misinterpreted. Real-life courtesy and decency carry over a lot more than in a Twitter discussion or a squabble in the comments section. “

OnlyFans and its creative economy

Among the protagonists of the trendy social networks there is also Kim Russell, known as The Kimbino, who creates content only for OnlyFans. The 25-year-old initially made a name for herself on Instagram, where her witty and quick ‘critiques’ of celebrities and fashion shows earned her 55,000 followers, including Kim Kardashian, whom Russell regards as a collaborator and style confidant. However, she soon felt overwhelmed by the culture of Instagram – the fact that “people don’t really pay attention to long captions” and all the changes the platform made to its algorithm (like replacing the timesheet for the shopping button). – they pushed her to look for new pastures.

During the lockdown, OnlyFans saw a monthly growth of 70%, totaling 85 million users last January. While the platform is mostly used by sex workers, a growing number of sports, fashion and even spiritual experts are starting to access the subscription service. For Russell, whose packages start at £ 6.50 a month, “OnlyFans was a godsend.”

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It’s part of a broader shift in the economy of creators, who are moving away from established institutions for subscription platforms like Patreon and Substack. OnlyFans has even launched a fund for emerging artists (four people will each receive £ 20,000 to launch their careers) to attract more and more creatives to the platform. “I hope that more and more people will move on this medium,” continues Russel, “because no one will say more interesting things for free!”

Even fashion loyalists are now changing sides (for example, Bottega Veneta has deleted all its social accounts), so the rise of TikTok, Clubhouse and OnlyFans presents the industry with an opportunity to regenerate. And even if it seems trivial to use these nascent social networks as a democratization of the industry, they nevertheless point towards an increasingly polyphonic future of fashion, and represent both a revenge against the sterility of Instagram, and an evolution of the culture of creatives.

Instagram may reign supreme for now, but as M’Pelé says, these new platforms will eventually “encourage people to listen to each other, understand different points of view, leading to more critical thinking,” and, knowing social media. media, could be nothing short of revolutionary.


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