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What did Saddam Hussein listen to before his death and other music that marked the famous

What Saddam Hussein ended his days before being executed enjoying “My Life” of Mary J. Blige or that Paul McCartney and Yoko Ono at least agree in pointing out a theme of John Lennon as his favorite are some of the findings in which he stops and recreates the latest book by the Spanish Máximo Pradera.

“They’re playing our song. The mother of all playlists. Music for a desert island” (Libros del Kultrum) is the very long title of this work that is already on the market and reveals the fetish listening of characters as varied as Adolf Hitler, Francisco Franco or Lenin, as well as Sophia Loren or Almudena Grandes .

“The most remarkable thing is that I am talking about very famous people, from Joan Baez to Paul MCCARTNEY or Cat Stevens, talking about pieces of music that move them and why they move them,” the author explains to Efe, before noting that, in almost all cases, “the common denominator is consolation.”

music and emotions

Thus, it relates how Victoria de los Angeles, “who had a horse depression”found solace in “Adagietto” from Gustav Mahler’s Fifth Symphony, while Isabel Allende immersed herself in “Greensleeves”, the “new age” piece that her daughter Paula listened to over and over again until her death from porphyria.

I could have written about “300 or 400” characters, but decided to limit himself on the one hand to the criterion of parity: he focused on twelve men and twelve women, some of them his idols, such as Patricia Highsmith or Lauren Bacall.

The other argument to focus their attention was that the songs with which each of them would go to a desert island “they had a lot of history behind”as is the case of the aforementioned “Greensleeves”, which seems to have been conceived by Henry VIII himself to entice Mary Boleyn.

Meadow, who already wrote “Play it again, Bach. Everything you need to know about flirting music”, He takes advantage of the popularity of the protagonists of his book to abound in musical analysis and explain, for example, tricks by which certain chord sequences manage to provoke what emotions.

celebrity favorite songs

Why the intro of Carl Orff’s “Carmina Burana” sounds so terrible or why Frank Sinatra “didn’t cut a hair in his concerts” by showing that he hated one of his biggest hits, “Strangers In The Night”, are some of the the stories in which these pages are recreated.

That was the song that often accompanied Saddam Hussein, who he used to dance it with one of his concubines at sunset in his palace in Baghdadaccording to the author, who uses humor in his writing style to recount his days before the gallows listening to “My Life” by Mary J. Blige.

“On the internet you can find many things about the favorite songs of celebrities, but the interesting thing is to know why. The good thing about this book is that it connects you with the emotional moment and thus you discover that if Springsteen did not abandon music in a moment of his life was because of a song by The Rolling Stones,” he defends.

In illustrating the power of music, “able to bring people together” of all kinds in times when “politics does the opposite”, Pradera brings up a clear example in which he dwells on this heterogeneous “playlist”: even McCartney and Yoko Ono found a point of agreement in their lives and it was his love for “Beautiful Boy” by John Lennon.

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