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Why does a wave of migrants cross the Channel? The fault is (also) of the Covid pandemic

The tragedy of the English Channel27 deaths so far ascertained, including a pregnant woman and three children, the most serious humanitarian disaster ever in those parts – brings with it, in addition to the pain and the sense of defeat, also a question that tries to account for the dimensions assumed by the mourning event: what’s happening along the border FranceGreat Britain? Why have migrants suddenly poured out so massively along one of the least traveled routes so far?

A flow of despair tripled in one year

It starts with the numbers. The flow of migrants in the course of 2021 is more than tripled compared to the one recorded (and reconstructed in its exact consistency based on different parameters) in 2020. The online newspaper Express.co.uk try to investigate around a disturbing phenomenon. What happened in a year?

So far in 2021, over 25,000 migrants have reached the UK by sea, a number that does not seem to show signs of slowing down. To be exact, according to the numbers provided last weekend by the Ministry of the Interior, the people in question amount to exactly 25,700 units. A huge figure, especially when compared to last year, when “alone” 8,469 it was the migrants who arrived in the UK by sea. The current year has seen that figure grow threefold, with 2021 not yet completed.

In a thousand in one day

By mid-July, the full 2020 figure had already been surpassed. Not only that: a new record for the number of migrants who arrived in a single day, when more than a thousand have landed on the English coasts. And last Saturday there were 28 crossings, separated from each other, which led to the identification, interception and rescue of nearly nine hundred people, 886 to be exact. On the same day, the French authorities carried out 14 interventions, preventing 446 people from heading to the UK. Then, the other day, the tragedy.

So far the quantitative analysis of the phenomenon. The question remains: why? While the number of migrants venturing northward across the Channel by boat has increased, the overall number of people who they seek asylum in the United Kingdom it decreased: in June 2021, 4% less than in the previous twelve months. The fact would be attributable to the more controls in British airports, air or sea, and also in motorway customs, applied due to the emergency Covid. For analysts, this is why fewer and fewer migrants use safer means – such as airplanes or trucks – to enter Her Majesty’s territories.

Fleeing from poverty, wars and persecutions

Where does this load of despair come from? The migrants who feed traffic and flows to the UK come from some of the poorest countries in the world, including Yemen, Sudan and Iraq. They often try to escape conflict, persecution and poverty to seek a better life for themselves and their families. Under international law, people have the right to seek asylum in whichever country they arrive and there is no rule that states that you must apply for it in the first safe country you come across. Currently, London And Paris they are coordinating resources to help prevent migrants from reaching the UK.

A commitment that Downing Street would have quantified in 54 million pounds: this, at least, the economic effort made official in July in favor of France for the current year and for the next with the aim of implementing the policies to contain migratory flows. For Priti Patel, interior minister of the government led by Boris Johnson, the law on nationality and borders – currently being reported in the House of Commons – is the “long-term solution” to address the problem, hoping to solve it. There are two points of attack for the legislation: combating human trafficking and new ways of selecting and filtering asylum requests. In the meantime, however, the Sleeve it is crowded with despair. And, after the latest tragedy, it risks becoming – like the Mediterranean – a new basin of death. Where to wreck dreams and hopes. In the meantime, the authorities beyond and on this side of the Canal are blaming themselves. A script already seen.

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James Reno

Editor-in-Chief, James loves playing games and loves to write about them more. He knows a lot about entertainment because he has done a drama course. James loves writing, so he is our writer. email: james@d1softballnews.com

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