Another World: review of the film by Stéphane Brizé

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What is missing a Another World?

If the subtraction and fixing that pauperistic vision of a cinema that wants the truth is a touch that unites the three films of the author and constitutes a directorial choice that wants to link them and make them a window on true conditions and desperations, with Another World the excessive lack of handling of the theme and its only real basis tend to flatten the story. A coherence in the register of modulations and results received from his two previous films that recur also in this final film, but depriving himself of the feeling that was what allowed the public to perceive the man even more than the worker within the works. An emotionality that Brizé had always been able to silently push into The law of the market And In war, which reached its maximum exposure, substituting people in flesh and blood for machine-workers.

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While not depriving Another World of a private compartment, focusing the film both on the difficulties experienced by the protagonist in his company, and those of a suffered divorce and a child in need of attention, in the film everything is always repeated the same in a convention that had never been so pronounced in the films by the author. A desire to over-dry one’s own story, leaving it lacking that intimate side it required. A closure in line with the stories of the past, which thanks to a high exponent wants to complete all the phases of annihilation of people. Yet, despite an always impeccable interpreter and extreme lucidity, Another World it does not strike as it should have. It does not stun, it does not mount with hatred and anger like other films. A simple film, too much. A story that Stéphane Brizé had to bring back, but putting more heart into it.

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