Health

Scientific work begins to measure the impact of stress on endometriosis on the Island

The stress factor continues to be a driver of clinical environments that can lead to serious exacerbations, this time with endometriosis.

Dr. Caroline Appleyard, director of the RISE Graduate Training Program at Ponce Health Sciences University, Dr. Idhaliz Flores Caldera, director of the Endometriosis Research Laboratory at the Ponce Research Institute.

The scientific literature insists that stress could increase the injuries caused by this disabling disease in patients who suffer from it.

And it is that since last year the team of scientists from the Ponce Health Science University (PHSU) have insisted on creating the ideal scientific field to demonstrate the impact that the stress factor has on patients diagnosed with the disease.

They are Dr. Idhaliz Flores Caldera, director of the Endometriosis Research Laboratory at the Ponce Research Institute and Dr. Caroline Appleyard, director of the RISE Graduate Training Program at Ponce Health Sciences University.

The endometriosis is a gynecological condition and inflammatory where parts of the uterus tissue grow outside of it. It affects the women of reproductive age and makes them strong cramps in your menstrual periodduring sexual intercourse and can also cause infertility.

Statistics indicate that one in 10 women suffers from this disease and it is estimated that there are 180 million women in the world.

However, the population of women with this disease or at risk of developing it do not always seek the necessary help to achieve an early diagnosis and appropriate clinical treatment.

The diagnosis against the disease can take between 7 and 8 years, according to Dr. Flores, who, in addition to being a researcher, is a patient of the disease.

“Stress causes an increase in the release of cortisol from the adrenal glands through the activation of what is known as the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. This affects different parts of the body and affects the blood pressure, the heart rate, the immune system and all of this contributes to the worsening of the inflammatory process,” explained the Medicine and Public Health researchers (MSP).

The team thinks that the stress factor, by activating the release of cortisol, in turn impacts the immune system and worsens the condition. They have even demonstrated it in experimental models and proved that the animals that received stress, before or after the induction of endometriosis, developed larger vesicles and in greater quantity.

A more severe condition of endometriosis was also demonstrated in rats, as previously stipulated in interview with Medicine and Public Health Dr. Appleyard.

For this reason, Dr. Flores confirmed to MSP the beginning of the recruitment of patients who can help contribute to the health of this population on the island.

Women who would like to be part of the effort must be diagnosed with endometriosis and despite the hormonal or surgical treatment received, they have not achieved effective help for symptoms, such as pain.

Other investigations by this team have also shown how this population can be classified as “changa”, in reference to the problem of stigma and minimization of the symptoms that this population of women present.

Patients can visit the page of the Puerto Rican Foundation for Patients with Endometriosis, allies of research, at www.endometriosispr.com or write to endopr@gmail.com.

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