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Why 8K TVs are going to be banned in Europe

Visitors look at a Signature 8K Oled TV at South Korean consumer goods giant LG's booth at the Internationale Funkausstellung (IFA), the international trade fair for consumer electronics and home appliances, on Sept. 2 2022 at the fairgrounds in Berlin.  (Photo by JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP via Getty Images)

Visitors look at a Signature 8K Oled TV at South Korean consumer goods giant LG’s booth at the Internationale Funkausstellung (IFA), the international trade fair for consumer electronics and home appliances, on September 2, 2022 at the Berlin fairgrounds. . (Photo by JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP via Getty Images)

If a few years ago we were told that we would be confined to our homes by a pandemic, or that Russia had invaded a neighboring country, we would not believe it; nor that they would prohibit us from buying a type of television.

The reality moves on a very fine edge, more typical of an episode of Black Mirror, and that is that some news is difficult to accept with the perspective of time. And it is what happens with what we bring you today: the European Union will ban the sale of 8K televisions, if nothing changes, from March 2023.

Why can you buy a 4K panel, but not an 8K one in the EU countries? We find the answer in consumption: this technology consumes much more electricity and, given the current energy crisis, it is in the sights of the institutions of the old continent.

An unexpected decision and with a (possible) patch solution

Locating the enemy and in the quest to eliminate devices that consume too much energy, the European bureaucracy has stepped on the accelerator and has caught manufacturers off guard.

This new directive requires manufacturers who want to sell their televisions in the EU to reduce their energy consumption, in such a way that 8K televisions, and various models of 4K panels, will not be able to be purchased in this market from March 2023.

Apparently, the regulation has been published so quickly that those affected have not had time to adapt to it, and for this reason, it would be possible for it to be revised. And a possible solution is being considered that is closer to a trick than an adaptation to the norm.

As we have been able to read in Digital Trends, manufacturers would be looking for a side door to the norm: it would be about creating “EU image mode” through which televisions would arrive preconfigured from the factory with reduced consumption, leaving it up to the user to change setting to 8K mode.

That is, buyers of an 8K would receive panels with very low luminosity in their homes and would have to access the menu to activate the “war mode” that triggers consumption. This possible solution would not be good for the manufacturers, who could receive a barrage of returns on suspicion that the device was damaged.

To avoid this dreaded scenario, the sellers would make an effort to communicate this modification, but as we pointed out to you, despite this, it has the appearance of sinking the sales of these televisions.

However, the European authorities do not seem very willing to negotiate possible alternatives, so if you intend to acquire this technology, you can advance your decision because the 8K will be cult items or resale on eBay or similar in the very near future.

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